Pusha Petrov

``You do not limit yourself to merely taking photographs``

Pusha Petrov – Pišćir, 2020, Series of 6 photoraphies / Limited edition of 6 + 1 A.P. 100/100 cm , digigraphie printing Hahnemühle paper Photo Rag 308g

In my case everything started from observing everyday life, as this is what is most readily available to me, and the ideas that form are incubated for a while and subject to self-interrogation

Pusha Petrov

b.1984

lives and works in Paris & Timisoara

Pusha Petrov, inside / out, 2017, variable shapes and sizes /45×60 cm, outdoor sticker

We are very happy to announce that Pusha Petrov has started a collaboration with Jecza Gallery, with her first solo show scheduled for September 2020. We invited curator Ami Barak to interview the artist.

With this occasion we are very proud to announce our second participation at Paris Photo, this time in the Main Section in a joint presentation with Anne-Sarah Benichou, presenting in dialogue the work of Constantin Flondor alongside Decebal Scriba and Pusha Petrov alongside Laurent Montaron.

Ami Barak: You describe yourself as a photographic artist, but in fact you do not limit yourself to merely taking photographs. You create works that go beyond the realm of photography as strictly understood. Could you explain the way you approach art?  

Pusha Petrov: Photography is a technique I’ve used for many of my projects, but my digital series are the result of an exploratory approach and of a research process to which I devoted a considerable amount of time. My relationship with the camera has actually been extremely intermittent. Living as I do in the age when images flow freely, I have chosen to use the camera only when I had formed a clear picture of my objective. At the same time, I have great admiration for people who develop a symbiotic relationship with their analogue camera and cannot conceive of going anywhere at all without taking it in their pocket, like the artist Lele Saveri, who never leaves his house without a spare film roll on him – something that has stuck with me.

In my case, until now I have adhered to a distinctly radical framework, and in the last few years I have experienced different aspects of production and of the process of working with images. We are living in times when it is possible for the majority of the people on this planet to create images, but what I find more interesting is how we answer the question of what you do with the image afterwards. Today there is a great problem with image selection and storage, both physical and virtual. Personally, I am very strongly attracted to object-type images. I am interested both in the way in which you can revisit an object, a space, an image, and in the impact an image has as soon as you put it in a different context. Until now I have felt the need to put my projects in two categories, aesthetic and documentary, with a tendency to keep them separate. Recently I have set to explore ways to bring together and find a home for both the documentary part of my work and the finished product.

And to answer your question, in my case everything started from observing everyday life, as this is what is most readily available to me, and the ideas that form are incubated for a while and subject to self-interrogation. I think I sometimes ought to be more daring. Lengthy contemplation is part of who I am, and this frequently makes me hesitant about the whole thing.

 

AB: You are a member of a small Bulgarian community from Banat, and I have observed that the idea of belonging and identity in the broader sense and an obvious attraction to cultural singularities are powerfully present in your projects.

PP: The decision to revisit aspects and traditions of a community in which I had spent my childhood sprang from a need I felt as soon as I went to live in France. Any distancing somehow brings with it both the need and the opportunity to reposition yourself vis-à-vis the things that constitute belonging, and this side of me kicked in when I succeeded in making my own zoom out.

Restricted communities have a set of unwritten rules that create a particular rhythm and way of perceiving life. I am drawn to the invisible part of things and unspoken protocols, because I can give them a new contour or discover a new facet. Actions that have to do with tradition deserve to be revisited or at least presented so that they can be archived in a more varied and creative way.

I recently became aware that I am fascinated by spaces that mark a transition. I could illustrate this either by referring to the rooms in the Soba(Room) series, in which I concentrated on a space dedicated to the major events of life (baptism, betrothal, death), or by citing the Pudgasnic series, where there is a whole ritual centred on traditional costume that takes place in a private feminine context and represents a symbolic moment when customs are passed on.

AB: During the 2017 Art Encounters Biennial, “Life – a way of using”, to which you were invited by Diana Marincu and myself, you exhibited two series of works that I felt were emblematic of your way of approaching things. Your way of handling everyday objects and actions subsequently became a distinctive mark of your work, a kind of signature. I am talking about “Marsupium à main”, those images of women’s handbags seen from above which, as they reveal their contents, distil a powerful erotic ambiguity. The same is true of “Inside Out”, a series of images of female clothing and lingerie thrown randomly on a bedroom floor, which can be seen as an extension of the private sphere into the public space.      

PP: While preparing these two series I had an indirect collaboration with people, since I regarded the articles of clothing and accessories as extensions of the individual. In the first series, as the title suggests, I associated the handbag with a marsupium, an intimate abdominal bag in which the personal items suggest the identity and needs of the woman who carries it. My wish here was to create a large-scale series, since the female sex fulfils diverse and complex roles and this object is a confidential support, an ephemeral x-ray of the bearer, both in its shape and in its contents. For this series I went out into the street and interacted with a variety of female passers-by in order to gain their permission to capture this item. For the Inside Out series, I used a pedestrian area as a display platform, combining a large number of stickers aiming to give a fresh context to acts that take place in privacy, randomly beside people’s beds and bathrooms. For me, tumbled clothes give concrete expression to a kind of liberation from an everyday burden, like an outer frame transiting space that represents an extension of a hidden identity.

I frequently call on people for help, and their contribution is essential in giving me access to images. I believe that even in an involuntary and somewhat tentative way I am concerned with interacting with the public and interrogating what exactly is still left in the private area, taking account of the fact that we live in a world in which the trend is towards exposing even the last vestiges of our privacy in the virtual space, which has become an integral part of the public space.

 

AB: After that, you did the Pudgasnić project, for which you took photographs of the bustles that make the back part of young girls’ clothing more attractive. They are worn at the time of a ritual. On the feast day of St Lazarus, all the women of the community meet together, and this prosthesis called Pudgasnić, worn at buttock level and concealed beneath their skirts, creates an ideal feminine shape, a standard of beauty that conforms to the tradition of the community. You thus reveal what has always been a well-hidden secret.

PP: When I asked if I could photograph this detail of the costume, those with whom I was interacting were at pains to explain to me the absolute insignificance and lack of aesthetic value of this hidden element, while at the same time stressing that without it they could not begin to put on their traditional costume. I believe it is interesting to question why the clothes worn by a girl are much heavier and more complicated than those of a boy and are designed in such a way that you need to add a kind of extension to hold them up and to give the wearer a sturdy shape. I think everyone is aware of what this item represents.

However, I felt that this hidden element deserved to be made visible, and to a certain extent I have given it official status, since I view it as a personal stamp applied to an era. Because each woman chooses the material for her extension and crafts it herself, these elements are an expression of individuality, especially when compared with the costume itself, which conforms to much more explicit rules. I would not wish to be misunderstood here, as all the components of the costume fascinate me, but my approach is not an ethnographic one.

In preparation for this series, I began five years ago to pay attention to the entire practice of the wearing of this costume by young girls on the day called Lazarica, a festival held eight days before Easter. There is a whole ritual surrounding this costume; it takes place in an intimate feminine context and involves many generations of women, who help the young girl dress herself in popular folk attire. We could go so far as to say that it is in fact an initiation, a symbolic moment when customs are transmitted. I decided to trace this custom over an extended period of time. I am thus concerned both with how this custom is changing over time and concurrently with the way in which I myself relate to the subject. One initial result of this documentary process was the aesthetic series of bustles, which I opted to photograph as independent objects separate from the costume.

Pusha Petrov, Marsupium à main, 2010, 72 x 48 cm, Epson digigraphie, series comprised of 21 images

AB: For “Des(coase) [Un(stitch)]”, in 2019 you succeeded in being allowed into the private space of the African hair salons in Paris to research the social and community function of their typical hairstyles as a testimony to collective affirmation. Their hair is of the greatest importance for Africans, since it makes it possible for them to be accepted by others. On the way to the hairstyle reaching its final form, the plaits and braids are tied with threads that are later removed. You have left these “Ariadne’s threads” as they are, as a contribution which I interpret as analytical in nature.

PP: Everywhere on the planet a hairdresser’s salon allows us to sample the community. It not only serves the need for aesthetic care, but at the same time also has undertones of a place of escape, recollection, and meeting. These are social spaces that bring together an extremely varied palette of information, characters and situations.

Paris has a multitude of facets, but the community sprang to my attention because of the energy of the boulevards where the beauty salons are located. All that vivacity and milling-around makes one think of a large family caught up in the preparations for a major event, and from one end of the street to the other you sense an extremely vibrant collective force focused on the aesthetics of the body. What charmed me was that this energy is to be found in the indoor spaces as well. Stylists proficient in the speedy execution of hair extensions and plaiting welcome a familiar clientele into these salons, in which confessions, tales of intrigue and even life advice are woven and unwoven during the many hours required for such hair dos to be created.

In the case of African extensions too, there is an invisible part of the process, with the natural hair being marginalised by the sewing into it of the extensions. The series Sewn with white thread originated precisely here, from my wish to make visible the manual dexterity involved in the beehive type of plaiting, in which a complicated structure of natural hair is created to serve as a base to support the extensions that are sewn into it. I also studied the skill of sewing in hair, with white thread being used instead of black at my request, to produce a decorative element.

As a consequence of this experience, my own “crowning glory” became a platform for communication in daily life, which stirred in me an interest in experimenting and in combining two platforms with which I was in contact during that period of residence: the artistic community of the Cité des Arts on the one hand, and the African community on the other. I found resemblances at the level of metaphor between their ways of functioning, and this led me to create the “Des(coase) [Un(stitch)]” series, a process in which I invited various artists to take the white stitching out of my hair and then asked them to perform their own intervention by sewing in my hair. Given the physical proximity needed to perform an activity of such a kind, I thus created an opportunity for discussions and confidences.

AB: I have noticed that in your most recent project-in-process, Pišćir, you investigate a special accessory, a type of sumptuous, expensive hair ornament involving embroidery with gold thread and sequins. This too is at one and the same time both identitary component and event. Why did it attract you and why did you want to single it out for an almost ethnographic representation?

PP: Following on from my Paris hair experience, I wanted to research the way the hair was worn in the community from which I come. So, in line with ancient tradition, until just before a girl married she wore her hair uncovered, either plaited or curled, but as soon as the marriage ceremony had taken place, young married women would covered their crowning glory, and those from wealthy families would adorn themselves with this valuable and rare accessory, which completely concealed the hair and was worn only on extremely important occasions.

My decision to display this rare item in a decontextualized way indicates that it is a performative presence because of its opulence; I wanted to direct viewers’ attention exclusively to the object and not to the wearer. By means of the image, the human body becomes merely a support for the object, which at the same time invites a fresh interpretation.

Pusha Petrov, Editions Pudgasnić, 2019, 12×16 cm, zigzag format open size 172×12 cm, bamboo paper, duplex printing, limited edition of 5 + 1 A.P

Ami Barak: Tu te prezinți ca o artista fotografa dar de fapt nu te limitezi strict la fotografii. Creezi lucrări care depășesc domeniul fotografiei stricto senso. Ași dori să explici in ce constă demersul tău artistic?

Pusha Petrov: Fotografia e un suport la care am recurs pentru o bună parte din proiecte, însă seriile mele digitale se concretizează ca urmare a unui demers explorator, respectiv a unei prealabile documentări căreia îi aloc un timp important. De altfel relația mea cu camera fotografică a fost una extrem de punctuală. Trăind în era fluxului de imagini am ales să apelez la acest dispozitiv doar în momentul în care mi-am definit clar ce urmăresc. Totodată admir foarte mult cei care dezvoltă relații de simbioză cu o cameră analogică, și nu concep să se deplaseze fără să o aibe în buzunar oriunde ar merge, cum ar fi artistul Lele Saveri, ce nu părăsește casa nicăieri fără o rezervă de film, ceea ce m-a impresionat. În cazul meu am adoptat până acum un protocol destul de radical și cred că în ultimii ani am ajuns să văd alte fațete al producției și al procesului de lucru cu imaginea. Timpurile în care trăim oferă șansa unei majorități planetare să creeze imagini, însă ceea ce devine mai interesant e răspunsul la întrebarea: ce faci cu imaginea apoi ? Pentru că astăzi o mare problemă revine trierii și stocajului, fie că vorbim de cel virtual sau cel fizic. Personal sunt atrasă foarte mult de imaginea de tip obiect, sunt interesată de maniera în care poți revizita un obiect, un spațiu, o imagine, cât și impactul pe care îl are o imagine din momentul în care o recontextualizezi. Până în prezent am simțit nevoia să îmi grupez proiectele în estetice și documentare, având tendința să le separ. Recent am început să chestionez cum pot găsi soluții care să confere și să găzduiască atât partea de documentare cât și finalitatea ei.

Şi ca să răspund la întrebare, în cazul meu totul a început prin a observa viața cotidiană, căci îmi este cea mai la îndemână, iar ideile care apar sunt incubate pentru o perioadă și chestionate. Cred că aș avea nevoie câteodată de mai multă temeritate, deoarece contemplarea îndelungată mă caracterizează și de multe ori mă face să pun la îndoială totul.

 

AB: Faci parte din mica comunitate a bulgarilor din Banat și constat că ideea de apartenență și identitate în sens larg, precum și o atracție manifestă pentru singularitățile culturale, sunt foarte prezente în proiectele tale

PP: Alegerea de-a revizita aspecte și tradiții din cadrul unei comunități unde am copilărit a venit ca o nevoie odată ce am ajuns să trăiesc în Franța. E oarecum nevoia și șansa oricărei înstrăinări, să te repoziționezi față de subiecte ce conturează apartenența, și latura aceasta s-a activat în momentul în care am reușit să fac propriul zoom out.

În comunități restrânse există o serie de coduri nescrise, care ajung să creeze un anume ritm și un fel de a percepe viata, iar pe mine mă atrage partea invizibilă a lucrurilor, căci le pot oferi un contur sau o nouă fațetă. Gesturile ce țin de tradiție merită revizitate sau cel putin prezentate pentru a fi arhivate într-o manieră mai variată și creativă.

Recent am realizat că am o fascinație pentru spații ce marchează o tranziție fie ca fac referire la încăperile din seria Soba, unde mă concentrasem pe un spațiu dedicat marilor evenimente ale vieții (botez, logodna, deces) fie în cazul seriei Pudgasnic, unde există un întreg ritual în jurul costumului tradițional, care are loc într-un cadru feminin intim și reprezintă un moment simbolic de transmitere a unor obiceiuri.

AB: În cadrul ediției din 2017 a Bienalei Art Encounters, Viața – mod de întrebuințare, unde ai fost invitata de Diana Marincu și mine, ai prezentat două serii de lucrări care mi sau părut emblematice pentru felul tău de a aborda lucrurile. Felul de a trata obiectele si gesturile zilnice a devenit ulterior un semn distinctiv, un fel de semnătură. Mă refer la „Marsupium à main”, aceste imagini ale posetelor pentru femei văzute de sus și care, în timp ce își dezvăluie conținutul, concentrează o puternică ambiguitate erotică. La fel si „Inside Out”, o serie de imagini cu haine și lenjerie de sex feminin aruncate întâmplător pe podeaua unui dormitor care devin o extensie a sferei private în spațiul public.

PP: În cadrul acestor două serii am avut parte de colaborarea indirectă a oamenilor, deoarece articolele și accesoriile vestimentare le-am privit ca pe extensii ale individului.

În cazul primei seri asa cum sugerează și titlul, am asociat geanta cu un marsupiu, respectiv o pungă abdominală intimă în care elementele personale conturează identitatea și nevoile purtătoarei. Mi-am dorit în acest caz să creez o serie mai amplă, deoarece sexul feminin îndeplinește diverse și complexe roluri, iar acest element devine un support confidențial, o radiografie efemeră a purtătoarei, atât prin forma cât și prin conținut. Pentru această serie am iesit în stradă și am interacționat cu diverse trecătoare pentru a obține permisiunea de a surprinde acest cadru. În cazul seriei Inside Out, am recurs la aleea pietonală, însă ca platforma de expunere, recontextualizând printr-o aglomerare de stickere, un gest intim ce îl regăsim aleatoriu în proximitatea patului sau a băii personale. Pentru mine hainele răvășite materializează o anume eliberare de o încărcătură cotidiană, ca o carcasă ce tranzitează în spațiu și reprezintă o extensie a unei identități ascunse.

În mod frecvent fac apel la oameni, iar aportul lor e esențial pentru a avea acces la imagine. Cred că involuntar și oarecum timid, mă interesează să interacționez cu publicul și să chestionez ce anume mai rămâne în zona intimului ținând cont că trăim într-o lume în care tendința este să ne expunem și ultima fărâmă de intimitate în spațiul virtual, care a devenit o partea integrantă a spațiului public.

 

AB: Apoi, ai realizat proiectul Pudgasnić, pentru care ai fotografiat perinițe de înfrumusețare a ținutei posterioare la fetițe, fiind purtate în momentul unui rit De sărbătoarea Sfântului Lazăr, toate femeilor din comunitate se aduna si aceasta proteza numita Pudgasnić, menținută la nivelul feselor si ascunsa sub fuste, creează un atribut feminin ideal, un standard de frumusețe conform tradiției comunității. Așa că dezvălui ceea ce a fost întotdeauna un mister bine disimulat.

PP: În momentul în care am cerut să fotografiez acest detaliu din costum, cei cu care interacționam insistau să-mi explice cât de insignifiantă este această piesă ascunsă, fără valoare estetică, însă totodată accentuau că fără ea nu pot începe îmbrăcarea portului. Cred că e interesant de chestionat de ce hainele unei fete în comparație cu cele ale unui băiat sunt mult mai grele și complexe, create în așa fel încât să ai nevoie să adaugi un fel de extensie pentru a le susține și respectiv pentru a da o formă robustă purtătoarei. Cred că toata lumea e conștientă de încărcătura acestei piese.

Am considerat însă că acest element ascuns merită vizibilitate, si oarecum l-am oficializat deoarece îl percep ca o amprentă personală a unor timpuri. Prin alegerea materialului și a gestului de-a fabrica o extensie, aceste piese sunt o expresie a individualității, mai ales în comparație cu costumul în sine care se conformează unor reguli mult mai clare. Aici aș dori să nu fiu înțeleasă greșit, deoarece toate elementele costumului mă fascinează, însă demersul meu nu este de natură etnografică.

Pentru această serie, am început în urmă cu 5 ani să observ întreg demersul purtării acestui costum la fetițe în contextul zilei de Lazarica, sărbătoare ce are loc cu opt zile înainte de Paști. Există un întreg ritual în jurul acestui costum, care are loc într-un cadru feminin intim și la care participă mai multe generații care o asistă pe fetiță în îmbrăcarea portului popular. Am putea chiar spune că e de fapt o inițiere, un moment simbolic de transmitere a unor obiceiuri. Mi-am propus să urmăresc acest obicei pe o perioadă mai îndelungată. Mă interesează astfel atât evoluția în timp a acestui obicei, cât și totodată felul în care eu mă raportez față de subiect. Un prim rezultat al evoluției acestei documentări a fost seria estetică a perinițelor, pe care am ales să le fotografiez ca un obiect de sine stătător, independent de costum.

Fotografia e un suport la care am recurs pentru o bună parte din proiecte, însă seriile mele digitale se concretizează ca urmare a unui demers explorator, respectiv a unei prealabile documentări căreia îi aloc un timp important.

Pusha Petrov, Editions Pudgasnić, 2019, 12×16 cm, zigzag format open size 172×12 cm, bamboo paper, duplex printing, limited edition of 5 + 1 A.P

AB: Pentru „(des) coase ((un) stich))”, în anul 2019 ai reușit să fii acceptată în intimitatea saloanelor de coafură africane din Paris, cercetând funcția socială și comunitară a coafurilor tipice ca mărturie a unei afirmații colective. Părul este de cea mai mare importanță pentru africani, deoarece le permite să fie acceptați de ceilalți. Pentru a atinge forma finală, codițele și împletiturile sunt legate cu fire care sunt apoi îndepărtate. Tu ai lăsat aceste fire ale Ariadnei așa cum sunt, ca o contribuție pe care eu o interpretez ca analitică.

PP: În orice colt al planetei un salon de coafură reprezintă un eșantion comunitar, ce răspunde nu numai unei nevoi de îngrijire estetică, având totodată și valențele unui loc de escapadă, de reculegere, de întâlnire. Sunt spații sociale ce interesectează o paletă foarte diversă de informații, personaje și situații.

Parisul are multe valențe, însă atracția față de comunitate a început de la energia bulevardelor ce găzduiesc saloanele de înfrumusețare. Toată vivacitatea și zarva e similară unei familii numeroase în toiul pregătirii unei eveniment major, iar de-a lungul străzii există o forță colectivă extrem de vie concentrată pe estetica corporală. Ceea ce m-a fermecat e că această energie persistă și în spatiile interioare. Specializate în rapiditate de execuție, extensiile de păr și împletiturile invită în aceste spații o clientelă familială, în care confesiunile, intrigile și chiar sfaturile se impletesc și despletesc de-a lungul numeroaselor ore de coafat.

Si în cazul extensiilor africane, există o parte invizibilă a procesului, părul natural fiind delimitat de coaserea în păr a extensiei. Seria Cusut cu ață albă a luat naștere tocmai din dorința de a face vizibilă manualitatea împletiturii de tip stup, ce creează o structură complexă a părului natural, ce va deservi ca structură de susținere și coasere a extensiei. De asemenea am urmărit și gestul artizanal de a coase în păr, ața neagră fiind înlocuită de ață albă la cererea mea, acest element devenind unul decorativ.

Ca urmare a acestei experiențe, podoaba capilară personală a devenit o platformă de comunicare în viața cotidiană, ceea ce mi-a trezit un interes să experimentez și să unesc două platforme cu care eram în contact în acea perioadă de rezidența. Pe de o parte comunitatea artistică de la Cité des Arts și cea africană. Am găsit similitudini metaforice a modului de funcționare, de aceea am ales să creez seria „Des(coase) (Un(stich))”, proces prin care am invitat diverși artiști să-mi desfacă cusătura albă, pentru a-i invita ulterior să intervină cu propriul gest de a coase în capul meu. Având în vedere de proximitatea necesară pentru o astfel de acțiune, am creat astfel prileji pentru discuții și confidențe.

AB: Am observat că ultimul tău proiect în desfășurare Pišćir te interesezi la un accesoriu special, un fel de coafură somptuoasă, prețioasă și brodată cu fire și paiete aurii, la rândul lui, constituent identitar și eveniment in același timp. De ce te-a atras și de ce ai dorit să îl singularizezi, aproape o reprezentarea etnografică?

PP: Ca urmare a experienței capilare pariziene, mi-am dorit să documentez modul de purtare a părului în cadrul comunității din care provin. Astfel conform tradiției vechi, până la preajma căsătorie părul era purtat liber, fie în codițe sau încrețit însă odată cu oficializarea relațiilor, tinerele căsătorite își acopereau podoaba capilară, iar cele din familiile înstărite se împodobeau cu acest accesoriu pretențios și rar, care era purtat doar la evenimente absolut speciale, părul fiind în intregime ascuns sub acest element.

Alegerea de-a prezenta decontextualizat această piesă rară denota și e o prezență performativă prin opulența sa, dorind să direcționez atenția strict pe obiect și nu pe purtătoare. Prin intermediul imaginii corpul uman devine doar un suport pentru obiect invitând totodată la o nouă lectură.

Pusha Petrov, 73,9 déka, 2019, Pugasnić serie of 10 photograpphies, limited edition of 5 + 1 A.P.  75 x 100 cm, digigraphie printing Hahnemühle paper Photo Rag 308g

Alegerea de-a revizita aspecte și tradiții din cadrul unei comunități unde am copilărit a venit ca o nevoie odată ce am ajuns să trăiesc în Franța. E oarecum nevoia și șansa oricărei înstrăinări, să te repoziționezi față de subiecte ce conturează apartenența

Pusha Petrov, 66,7 déka, 2019, Pugasnić serie of 10 photograpphies, limited edition of 5 + 1 A.P.  75 x 100 cm, digigraphie printing Hahnemühle paper Photo Rag 308g

În comunități restrânse există o serie de coduri nescrise, care ajung să creeze un anume ritm și un fel de a percepe viata, iar pe mine mă atrage partea invizibilă a lucrurilor, căci le pot oferi un contur sau o nouă fațetă.

(…) în cazul seriei Pudgasnic, unde există un întreg ritual în jurul costumului tradițional, care are loc într-un cadru feminin intim și reprezintă un moment simbolic de transmitere a unor obiceiuri.

Pusha Petrov, 22,1 déka, 2019, Pugasnić serie of 10 photograpphies, limited edition of 5 + 1 A.P.  75 x 100 cm, digigraphie printing Hahnemühle paper Photo Rag 308g

În momentul în care am cerut să fotografiez acest detaliu din costum, cei cu care interacționam insistau să-mi explice cât de insignifiantă este această piesă ascunsă, fără valoare estetică, însă totodată accentuau că fără ea nu pot începe îmbrăcarea portului. (…) Există un întreg ritual în jurul acestui costum, care are loc într-un cadru feminin intim și la care participă mai multe generații care o asistă pe fetiță în îmbrăcarea portului popular. Am putea chiar spune că e de fapt o inițiere, un moment simbolic de transmitere a unor obiceiuri. Mi-am propus să urmăresc acest obicei pe o perioadă mai îndelungată.

Pusha Petrov, Editions Pudgasnić, 2019, 12×16 cm, zigzag format open size 172×12 cm, bamboo paper, duplex printing, limited edition of 5 + 1 A.P

Pusha Petrov, inside / out, 2017, variable shapes and sizes /45×60 cm, outdoor sticker

În cadrul acestor serii am avut parte de colaborarea indirectă a oamenilor, deoarece articolele și accesoriile vestimentare le-am privit ca pe extensii ale individului.

Pusha Petrov, inside / out, 2017, variable shapes and sizes /45×60 cm, outdoor sticker

În cazul seriei Inside Out, am recurs la aleea pietonală, însă ca platforma de expunere, recontextualizând printr-o aglomerare de stickere, un gest intim ce îl regăsim aleatoriu în proximitatea patului sau a băii personale.

Pentru mine hainele răvășite materializează o anume eliberare

Pusha Petrov, inside / out, 2017, variable shapes and sizes /45×60 cm, outdoor sticker

Pusha Petrov, (des)coase, 2019, series of 10 photographies, 110/157 cm, William Turner paper, 310g

În orice colt al planetei un salon de coafură reprezintă un eșantion comunitar, ce răspunde nu numai unei nevoi de îngrijire estetică, având totodată și valențele unui loc de escapadă, de reculegere, de întâlnire.

Parisul are multe valențe, însă atracția față de comunitate (africană) a început de la energia bulevardelor ce găzduiesc saloanele de înfrumusețare. Toată vivacitatea și zarva e similară unei familii numeroase în toiul pregătirii unei eveniment major, iar de-a lungul străzii există o forță colectivă extrem de vie concentrată pe estetica corporală.

Pusha Petrov, Cusut cu ață albă, 2019, series of 7 prints, 120/154 cm, digigraphie printing, Cold Press paper 300

Pusha Petrov, inside / out, 2017, variable shapes and sizes /45×60 cm, outdoor sticker

For further inquires please contact our sales team: